With Gov. Phil Murphy signing three laws this week that immediately legalizes recreational marijuana, the attention now turns to the workplace protections.

As NJ.com’s Amanda Hoover wrote this week, the new policy does allow employers who have reasonable suspicion that a worker who is high at work to conduct a drug test. But because marijuana stays in the blood stream longer than alcohol, an employer will need to hire or train a certified expert to evaluate for signs of inebriation.

While the state Cannabis Regulatory Commission must still adopt formalized rules and regulations, the law says employers cannot fire an employee unless they can prove they were high at work through the drug test and testimony from the certified expert.

NJBIA Vice President of Government Affairs Ray Cantor told Hoover that employers need to start re-evaluating their drug-free workplace policies.

“We think existing law is still in place,” Cantor said. “(Employers) can still do what they’ve been doing. But they need to begin to become aware that those rules are going to change. So if you’re relying solely on drug tests right now, they should become familiar with what the law is going to require.”

Following Murphy’s announcement, NJBIA Chief Government Affairs Officer Chrissy Buteas issued a statement criticizing that the new rules fall short on allowing businesses to effectively maintain drug-free workplaces.

To see the NJ.com story, click here.

To see Buteas’ statement, click here.

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